Evoenix:Edits

Did they win, or did you lose? 

If you’re a Service Leaver, Veteran or Reservist who is adapting to life after the military, my weekly emails will help you.

Because there is a difference. 

They might have won through preparedness, focus, wise choices and tactically forcing errors. 

Or, you lost due to too many unforced errors, distractions, mindset and being off your game. 

If you’re not winning as much as you’d like, it might be worth evaluating and addressing how well you are losing. 

If you have been forwarded this by a friend, they thought of you and you can subscribe here.

Time and Milestones

If you’re a Service Leaver, Veteran or Reservist who is adapting to life after the military, my weekly emails will help you.

Recently we celebrated the Platinum Jubilee for dear old Queenie.

And after watching the montages of her reign, it’s times like these when you realise the finite quality of life.

And also the leaps we make from one milestone to the next.

Even looking back at the Diamond Jubilee celebrations 10 years ago, we have made massive tech leaps in the light shows and displays. Let alone the tech many of us now have in our homes and workplaces.

We get to remember how far we have come in such a short space of time.

Ever present, always becoming history.

If you have been forwarded this by a friend, they thought of you and you can subscribe here.

Allies

If you’re a Service Leaver, Veteran or Reservist who is adapting to life after the military, my weekly emails will help you.

You would think that allies are found on common ground.

What if, there was a place to discuss and explain what each of us sees from our perspective?

Sure, differences of opinion are likely to emerge.

And by leading with curiosity to better understand each other’s perspectives, it might be you have more in common than you first thought.

Often, our greatest allies can be formed in the most unlikely of places and circumstances.

If we took the time to get to know them.

If you have been forwarded this by a friend, they thought of you and you can subscribe here.

Working with Others

If you’re a Service Leaver, Veteran or Reservist who is adapting to life after the military, my weekly emails will help you.

How might we need to do less working, and more listening?

What is your poker face really saying? And how might it be letting you down?

Maybe you have a “tell”, does everyone else know what that means, or are you assuming?

If you could create a secret code for your team, what might it indicate? And how will you ensure everyone knows about it?

“Show-smiles everyone 😁”, may work in the short term as a necessary tactic. How are you ensuring this isn’t becoming the long term go-to strategy?

Vulnerability is not about baring your soul and airing your dirty laundry.

Vulnerability is knowing when you need help, and having the courage to ask for it from the right people, at the right time and in the right way.

How might you offer time and space for that process to happen?

Being a professional leader does not automatically grant the status of being the only genius in the room.

It’s everyone else who gets to decide that. So, where might other geniuses be lurking, fearing to raise their hand and be heard?

If you have been forwarded this by a friend, they thought of you and you can subscribe here.

Nostalgia Wednesday

If you’re a Service Leaver, Veteran or Reservist who is adapting to life after the military, my weekly emails will help you.

There is a phrase doing the rounds.

“The Great Resignation” – the pandemic has prompted people to re-evaluate their careers and values and how they want to live their lives.

And it got me thinking because I had used this phrase in my early blogging days when I was leaving the Royal Navy.

And I was glad to look back on this blog and discover its relevance endures.

The Great Resignation – 19th Aug 2019

It had been a 14-year military career in the making that led to two major setbacks occurring in quick succession and still, I was ready to carry on regardless and not let it get me down.

But that just didn’t feel right this time.

It seemed like there was an opportunity presenting itself and I would be daft to keep persisting. The time was right and I had to make the decision, to hand in my notice and terminate my employment with the military.

And all because someone said, “No, I’m afraid you can’t have your feedback”

If you have been forwarded this by a friend, they thought of you and you can subscribe here.

Autonomy from the Establishment 

If you’re a Service Leaver, Veteran or Reservist who is adapting to life after the military, my weekly emails will help you.

Thanks to tech and platforms, the gatekeepers and curators are fast becoming a thing of the past. 

If you want to express your voice, publish a book, write a blog or host a podcast – go head! 

E-commerce – you have access to the tools. 

Build a community and cross-pollinate the networks – Find individuals that feel isolated and gather them. 

The gravest mistake people make is then moderating that community. It appears to be a sensible approach at first. It is after all for safety and fairness. 

That is until people begin to feel filtered and censored.

Sure, you need to educate the members on the conduct expected and re-educate when poor behaviour begins to creep in. 

But moderating everyone rarely cultivates the organic free-thinking supportive community you set out to achieve. 

Our modern culture teaches us that moderators and curators are there to create barriers. 

It also teaches that barriers are made to be broken. 

And if those barriers are too deeply established, we are free to go and find something else. 

If you have been forwarded this by a friend, they thought of you and you can subscribe here.

I screwed up!

If you’re a Service Leaver, Veteran or Reservist who is adapting to life after the military, my weekly emails will help you.

I screwed up… on a few things today.

Mainly, forgetting I had not scheduled a blog until the night before publishing and needed to come up with an insightful topic of discussion sufficient enough to provoke thought in my dear readers…

For that, I am grateful for your patience and understanding.

However, this fact did remind me of an occurrence only just today.

Another screw-up…

Which required me to then have a conversation with a client and explain said screw up. And obvs present a solution.

And that I did.

Until… the boss rang and it was noted I had overpromised and created yet another screw-up.

Doh!!!

Not to worry. We formulated a plan and I went back to the client yet again to explain, and that I was not up for employee of the month, with profuse apologies.

However, they were not happy with Plan…C, and would be speaking directly to the boss to resolve it.

I had briefed the boss of this outcome and an email from the client would be inbound.

The message began with, “I screwed up this negotiation…”

It was at that moment that I released, not many folks get to start an email to the boss this way.

I feel completely able to be open and transparent – AND IT IS GLORIOUS!!!

If your organisation is not fostering a culture and an environment that enables people to screw up… please think again.

Even though I screwed up, it was a “keep calm and carry on” moment and I then spent the rest of the day fully engaged with my tasks and made significant progress.

This would not have happened had I been worrying about the screw-up, that tomorrow, will matter not.

I am a happier person for it, as is the organisation.

If you have been forwarded this by a friend, they thought of you and you can subscribe here.

We get to do stuff now

If you’re a Service Leaver, Veteran or Reservist who is adapting to life after the military, my weekly emails will help you.

In my line of work, I have been tinkering with the idea to build an app.

I assumed this would be hard for me and avoided looking into it.

Then I saw a post about the software available to help people build apps. All low code, drag and drop sort of stuff. And even more enlightening – I already had this software sitting waiting for me on my computer. Who knew???

And I was reminded of when I first got into WordPress and building my website. That looked all very complicated too until I started a learn-by-doing approach.

I might add, that this was not an easy transition. Late nights, typing and clicking through the tears and thoughts of launching my laptop out the window were regular occurrences.

But soon enough, the actions needed to achieve the desired outcome became less about thinking and more about just doing. It became instinctive and natural. It’s easy for me now.

With renewed motivation – I have started my app building adventure, Mac is securely taped to the desk with HBM!!!

Fully aware of my current incompetence, I remain undeterred, knowing this too shall pass and eventually I will get to a point where I can do it.

Well, no. There’s more to it.

That feeling is something I have become accustomed to since leaving the military.

Before, if there was no requirement to do something – then it didn’t happen.

I knew my roles and responsibilities and executed them well above the standard expected.

I had an awareness of other people’s roles and responsibilities and if needed I could fill the gap.

But as for – I’m just doing this because I can – not so much.

Now, if I want to try something new, I will (eventually, once the impostor and inner critic finish their debate).

It’s become less about having to do things and more of a “I get to do it” and because I want to.

“Try not. Do or do not. There is no try.”

Happy Star Wars Day

If you have been forwarded this by a friend, they thought of you and you can subscribe here.

I want you around, just not ALL the time.

If you’re a Service Leaver, Veteran or Reservist who is adapting to life after the military, my weekly emails will help you.

You have just spent a number of years doing the weekly Whacky Races.

Flitting between home and work and making sacrifices for Queen and Country in your military career. Missing birthdays, first steps and Nativity plays.

Then, you leave and all that conflict disappears…

Or does it?

Now you are home 24/7 and screwing with the routine.

Sure, it was fine for a few weeks while you were home on leave and weekends.

But now it’s permanent.

And there is a difference. Whilst our loved ones are glad we are not deployed for months on end, on the front line, running around with a rifle putting ourselves in harm’s way – a job away in the week might be a mutually agreeable alternative.

And to get there, that requires a very open and honest conversation, where everyone is free to air their desires and concerns. The Serving Person is not the only one leaving the Service.

Assuming other people’s wants rarely ends well.

Might the better approach be to find out for sure?

If you have been forwarded this by a friend, they thought of you and you can subscribe here.